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they are teaching. when you have a tragedy as bad as connecticut, the teachers on top of the parents have also lost a child. i had two teachers in elementary schools. the security there is as much as the security is going to get in the school. when you look at schools and said, this is the safest place to be. for it to happen in an elementary school, the first school you enter as a child, that is devastating. when you see the parents crying and upset, you have to rush back to your child's school because there has been this devastating event happened. host: you are an educator in baltimore and we are showing the front page of "the baltimore sun." talk to us about the security of your school. what does a person have to do to get into the school during the school day? caller: you have to be bused in, you go to the office to get a pass. the office personnel are not equipped to handle a gunman coming through the door. even if you take the precaution of having the doors locked and going through the office first, there is no security in the office. there is no security guard. you just sign in and say what
to the shooting in connecticut. >> i called on congress today to act immediately on what is appropriate to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> the headline in this morning's baltimore sun reflects those across the country. from the tribune's washington magazine, it's said when he weight in friday he delivered a lashing speech that included violent movies and video games as he said his plan would train those to guard our schools. in this edition of today's program, we're going to begin the first 45 minutes of the program to talk about the nra's response to the shootings. they broke their silence yesterday with executive director and vice president wayne. we'll talk more about what he had to say. but we want to get you involved in the conversation. so the numbers on your screen. guest: we also have a special line this morning for members of the n.r.a. (202)585-3883 this is for n.r.a. members. you can also reach out to us at twitter.com/cspanwj and f.s.a
, connecticut, speaking to the community hit by friday's elementary school shootings. it's monday, december 17, 2012. the president offered words of solidarity and state and pledged to use the power of the presidency and to prevent future killings. some are asking whether that is an indication on whether he will push for stronger gun control laws. question for you is and should u.s. gun laws change? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join the conversation on facebook, or send us an e-mail. our question for you is whether u.s. gun laws should change? here's the headline in "usa today" -- jumping down into the story, it says -- others are exploring the question of gun laws. we will hear some comments from members of congress this morning. congressional democrats are vowing to push for stricter gun control laws. several democratic lawmakers called yesterday for a new push for gun restrictions, including a ban on military-style assault weapons in the wake of the connecticut massacre. democratic senator dianne feinstein is the author of an assault weapon
in newtown, connecticut has gone far beyond gun control to include a focus on mental health programs and pervasive violence in popular culture. lawmakers calls for an examination of those issues echo president obama who want a comprehensive approach for violence prevention that would end tougher gun laws and take on a culture of violence that many fear is ken coaching too much on american life. goes on to say lieberman is a local appropriate. the connecticut will -- jay: do the governments have a role in this? it goes on to say as a population, people with mental illnesses are less violent than the general generation add taggert the biggest red flags for violence are being of sub stance abuser, having a history of aggression, but generalizing -- it is considered far too early to draw any conclusions. -- people wait months for an outpatient appointment -- host: on to the internet, a mother's blog has spelled out the obstacle to finding help for michael, her troubled 24-year-old son -- and this blog posting coming criticism from others this morning. read a little bit more from as that
. coming up next we will talk to john larsen, the outgoing democratic caucus chair from connecticut. later on we continue our fiscal cliff series with a discussion on the impact it has on social security. we will be right back. ♪ [video clip] >> the white house was very controversial. there was competition for the design of washington city. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly all inspiring. in 1821 a european diplomat told congress that it was neither large nor khatami inspiring -- often inspiring -- awe inspiring. perhaps some president would be inclined to become the permanent resident if it were. >> niki goldberg has gathered some of her favorite white house photos. watch on sunday evening. eastern and space -- eastern and pacific. >> my inspiration was the idea that i wanted to explain how it happened. we do know the story of the cold war. we know the documents, we have seen the archives that describe the relationships between roosevelt, stalin, churchill, and truman. we know the main events from our point of view. what i wanted to do was show it from a differ
morning. are you with us? last chance. we will move on to doreen in connecticut. caller: i'm a small business owner. host: what kind of business? caller: i do alterations. in the evening return our business into a zumba class for ladies. my daughter and i seem to be doing pretty good. the ladies we hire as seamstresses are independent contractors. these are skills they got from their parents who taught them how to sew. we just went and put out advertising saying we needed seamstresses and we got six good seamstresses. we pay them enough that they can get their own health-insurance and they seem to be doing pretty well. i don't think that giving people the assistance in helping to further their endeavors is a bad thing. i think people who tried to stop people from making it further, they are just being selfish, because you can help individuals if they have skills. they don't have to have a college education to have certain skills. you can use those skills to your advantage and still help them along the way. they can get thrown help insurance. small businesses really are not hurting in
is an independent from connecticut. caller: thank you for taking my call. i really like hillary clinton. i think she is a hard worker. i think her old man is a hard worker, too. whitewater was like three wars ago. that was a long time ago. i would like to see jeb bush run against hillary clinton. i think they can move our nation forward. host: if jeb bush -- if it is a bush-clinton race, for whom would you vote? caller: oh, gosh. i would lean towards jeb at this piont because he has really been pushing education. right now, he's got me. host: stephen, who did you vote for in 2008? in 2012.ean caller: i voted for president obama. i really liked mitt romney. why do i have to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? that really bugged me. host: that is stephen from connecticut. tyrone is a republican from the bronx. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate in 2016. i think she handled the middle eastern issue to the best of her ability. also, as far as the gop is concerned, i think she has made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with
joe lieberman of connecticut. he is very self-serving and pompous and self righteous stereotype of a senator. he is a tragic figure with the democratic party, a man who was a vice president until candidate and yet could find a way to stab his own party in the back time after time. thank you. host: these are examples that you can tell us about those in congress departing in 2012 you will miss the most were the least. pick the number that best represents you on the screen and be prepared to tell us why. caller: nashville, tenn., democrats lined next. are you there? caller: i want to wish you a merry christmas and i would like to ijuan williams a merry christmas as well. i will miss senator arlen specter. host: go ahead. caller: i like to wish you a merry christmas. . host: you would miss the sport -- senator specter from pennsylvania? caller: yes, i don't know if you heard me. that was all i had to say. host: why will you miss him? let's move onto james from ocean springs, mississippi, democrats line. caller: it will be barney frank that i will miss the most. the are still more to
and work at these nonprofits. it is an economic generator in this town. host: jim from connecticut, republican line. caller: i have two questions. first, if there is no agreement by the december 31st deadline, can the congress act in such a way that any change in the law would be retroactive to january 1, 2013? do you believe the congress will consider solving for the individual taxpayer instead of the lobbyists? how do we get that turned around? guest: my answer to the upper question now, whether or not they can retroactively take on some of these issues so they do not pass it they can go on in postdate, that is something that have done quite often in terms of tax extensions in different bills where they will pass in february but it will be effective until january. host: industries benefiting most from this issue in terms of lobbying against sequestration in this issue of the fiscal cliff. education, health care, civil service and public officials. our last call joining us from buffalo, new york, good morning. caller: are you there? host: please, go ahead. caller: i am 21 years ol
us on the democratic line from connecticut. caller: good morning. my question is, in watching c- span over the years, i noticed there was once an episode where an economist talked-about a world view on reducing the imprint of the military and using limited black ops and to intervene in situations to quell unrest in the discos along with the things like the economy -- this goes along with things like the economy. my question is how do you see us going black ops and the cia? is this not what we did in afghanistan? guest: i understand there is a very wrong perception among the public that all special ops do are black ops and unilateral raids in the dead of night. that perception is widely held. in the case of columbia, the philippines, yemen, these other places that i am talking about, the governments have invited special operations forces in to help them, to help their country's forces. that is why i think it is such an effective use in the long term. it does not cause the same political diplomatic controversy as many people know what happened after the bin laden rate. it was a huge rup
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

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